DNA Disease & Trait Tests

DNA testing offers many opportunities for breeders and pet owners alike. Hereditary disease testing can allow for accurate diagnosis of disease status of your dog (clear, carrier or affected). Testing for hereditary diseases helps to create a clearer picture for the future health and happiness of your animals. Market your pedigree dogs as "disease free", provide puppy buyers with disease free DNA papers and PROOF and eradicate genetic diseases from your breeding in 'one' breeding cycle.

These are the tests Animal Network currently offers:

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Test Name
Description of Disease/Trait
Price
 
Clear By Parentage
Unique Identification with Genetic Comparison
By confirming the parentage of a puppy/dog whose parents have previously been tested for genetic disease, we can produce a 'clear by parentage' result, determining the puppy's genetic disease status through their parentage.$70more information
Collie Eye Anomaly
Eye Disease
CEA is an inherited disease affecting eye development. The major issue is 'choroidal hypoplasia', a pale patch in the back of the eye caused by abnormal development of the choroid layer. In severe cases can cause blindness.$200more information
Collie Eye Anomaly (Puppy)
Eye Disease
CEA is an inherited disease affecting eye development. The major issue is 'choroidal hypoplasia', a pale patch in the back of the eye caused by abnormal development of the choroid layer. In severe cases can cause blindness.$140more information
Cystinuria
Deficiency that affects the Kidney
CYN is caused by a defect in the transport of cystine, an amino acid, in the kidney. Dogs with Cystinuria do not properly reabsorb cystine, causing their urine to contain abnormally high levels. Excess urinary cystine results in formation of cystine crystals, which can lead to formation of cystine calculi (stones) in the kidney and/or bladder. Males with Cystinuria suffer repeated inflammations of the urinary tract and are at higher risk for urinary blockage, which can, if not treated promptly, lead to kidney failure, bladder rupture, and death.$120more information
Degenerative Myelopathy
Progressive disease of the spinal cord in older dogs
Canine degenerative myelopathy (also known as chronic degenerative radiculomyelopathy) is a progressive disease of the spinal cord in older dogs. The disease has an gradual onset typically between 7 and 14 years of age. It begins with a loss of coordination (ataxia) in the hind limbs. The disease is chronic and progressive, and resulting in paralysis. This disease results in slowly progressive neurological disease that that is not painful and non-reversible. Dogs affected with degenerative myelopathy ultimately lose muscle mass from the disuse of their back legs and have difficulty getting up to go outside to urinate and defecate.$100more information
Exercise Induced Collapse
A syndrome of exercise intolerance and collapse (EIC) has been recognized in young adult Labrador Retrievers.$100more information
Familial Nephropathy
Kidney Disease
Hereditary nephropathy is a broad term for certain fatal inherited diseases that in the cocker spaniel are due to a type IV collagen defect that result in renal (kidney) failure. $125more information
Hereditary Cataract
Eye Disease
Cataract is a disease of the lens of the eye in which the normally clear lens becomes opaque or white. This interferes with vision and can result in blindness. Cataracts are the most common cause of blindness in dogs, it is progressive and bilateral (affecting both eyes). $95more information
Ivermectin Sensitivity MDR1
Drug Sensititivity
Invermectin is used as a preventitive heartworm drug. A mutation in the MDR1 gene prevents the production of a substance which removes the drugs and toxins from the brain, this causes the accumulation of higher levels of the drug in the brain and other tissues, this can lead to severe neurological side affects, respiratory arrest and death. This sensitivity is not restricted to Ivermectin only, increased sensitivity to other drugs can occur also.$75more information
L-2-hydroxyglutaric Aciduria
Metabolic Disorder
L-2-HGA is a neurometabolic disorder that is characterized by elevated levels of L-2-hydroxyglutaric acid in urine, plasma and cerebrospinal fluid, this produces a variety of clinical neurological defects, including psychomotor retardation, altered behvaiour, seizures and defects in the central nervous system that can lead to ataxia (lack of coordination in muscle movements).$100more information
Long Hair Gene
Long Hair Gene
The long hair gene is a gene that causes a longer length coat, it is a recessive gene and will only be observed if two carrier dogs are bred. It is however considered a breed fault and many breeders are advised to test for the gene to prevent carriers if undesirable.$100more information
Natural Bob Tail
Genetic mutation causing bone distortion
Natural bobbed tails (a natural shortening of the coccyx or tail bone) occurs in several species. The gene that causes the bobtail generally produces no obvious effects other than the shortened tail, when seen in the heterozygous condition, though various levels of penetrance are seen. However when this gene for bobtails appears in it's dominant homozygous form, it becomes a lethal allele at the embryonic level and usually results in small litter sizes as homozygous dominant pups do not survive.$100more information
Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis
Neurological Disorder
NCL are a class of inherited neurological storage disorders that result in pathological degenerative changes in the central nervous system. Storage diseases can primarily affect the cerebellum, but they usually affect multiple areas of the brain and spinal cord and can result in cerebellar atrophy.$110more information
Parentage Confirmation
Unique Identification with Genetic Comparison
DNA verification that the dog/pup being tested is the offspring of the dam and sire submitted for parentage testing.$70more information
Primary Lens Luxation
Primary Lens Luxation (PLL) is an eye condition that can cause irreversible blindness if left untreated. It is caused by the displacement of the lens within the eye of an affected dog. It occurs when the fibres that normally suspend the lens degenerate, causing the lens to detach. This disorder commonly occurs in both eyes of an affected dog.$120more information
Profiling
Unique Identification, Parentage and Clear By Parentage
Shows the dog’s unique DNA profile at 11 specified canine markers thus demonstrating that the dog has been DNA profiled.$70more information
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (cord 1 PRA)
Eye Disease
Due to the cord1 mutation, affected dogs can suffer from early to late onset, the age of onset varies dramatically, and thus can produce offspring with the same disorder that suffer severe blindness in early life, breeding between carriers is discouraged.$95more information
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (Dominant)
Eye Disease
Progressive disorder of the retina, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait due to a mutation in the gene for rhodopsin. Higher risk due to mode of inheritance.$135more information
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRCD)
Eye Disease
Progressive Rod/Cone Degeneration causes degenerative lesions of the retina, that causes night blindness and eventually lead to total blindness.$215more information
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (Puppy)
Eye Disease
Progressive Rod/Cone Degeneration causes degenerative lesions of the retina, that causes night blindness and eventually lead to total blindness.$150more information
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (Type A)
Eye Disease
Slow progressive degeneration of the retina, not seen until 2-5 years. Initially dogs are night blind and then progress to day blindness.$145more information
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (X-Linked)
Eye Disease
Progressive degeneration of the retina due to X linked gene. Requires homozygous affected female or heterozygous affected male.$140more information
Von Willebrand's Disease (Type 1)
Blood Clotting Disorder
Type I vWD is characterized by low concentrations of structurally normal vWF, but tends to be a milder and more variable form.$125more information
Von Willebrand's Disease (Type 3)
Blood Clotting Disorder
Type III vWD is found in animals that have essentially no plasma vWF, thus will suffer the most severe bleeding.$125more information